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  1. Frederick was the last Hohenzollern monarch titled King in Prussia, declaring himself King of Prussia after annexing Royal Prussia from the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1772. Prussia greatly increased its territories and became a major military power in Europe under his rule.

    Frederick the Great - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_the_Great
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  3. Frederick the Great - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_the_Great

    Frederick was the last Hohenzollern monarch titled King in Prussia, declaring himself King of Prussia after annexing Royal Prussia from the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1772. Prussia greatly increased its territories and became a major military power in Europe under his rule.

  4. Frederick Barbarossa - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Barbarossa

    Frederick Barbarossa (December 1122 – 10 June 1190), also known as Frederick I (German: Friedrich I, Italian: Federico I ), was the Holy Roman Emperor from 1155 until his death 35 years later. He was elected King of Germany in Frankfurt on 4 March 1152 and crowned in Aachen on 9 March 1152.

  5. What is Prussia? | History, Location & Contributions - Video ...

    study.com/learn/lesson/prussia-rise-history...

    In 1701, Leopold I of Austria allows Frederick I to call and crown himself a king in Prussia, due to assistance provided to him by Prussia in the War of Spanish Succession.

  6. House of Hohenzollern - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Hohenzollern

    The Duke of Prussia adopted the title of king as Frederick I, establishing his status as a monarch whose royal territory lay outside the boundaries of the Holy Roman Empire, with the assent of Emperor Leopold I: Frederick could not be "King of Prussia" because part of Prussia's lands were under the suzerainty of the Crown of the Kingdom of ...

  7. Elector Frederick III of Brandenburg (r. 1688-1701), the future King Frederick I of Prussia (r. 1701-1713) threw a grand reception for the Grand Embassy with a large procession into the city taking place. In the march were grooms, Royal Guards, nobility, pages and the members of the Grand Embassy.

  8. Hohenzollern dynasty | History, Religion, Countries, & Facts

    www.britannica.com/topic/Hohenzollern-dynasty

    The change to “king of Prussia” was not formally recognized until 1772, when Frederick the Great obtained it. The kings of Prussia retained their title of electors of Brandenburg until the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806. In 1871 William I of Prussia became German emperor.

  9. War of the Austrian Succession - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_of_the_Austrian_Succession

    The War of the Austrian Succession [f] was a European conflict fought between 1740 and 1748, primarily in Central Europe, the Austrian Netherlands, Italy, the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Related conflicts include King George's War in North America, the War of Jenkins' Ear, the First Carnatic War, and the First and Second Silesian Wars .

  10. Frederick the Great - Definition, Meaning & Synonyms ...

    www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/Frederick the Great

    Definitions of Frederick the Great. noun. king of Prussia from 1740 to 1786; brought Prussia military prestige by winning the War of the Austrian Succession and the Seven Years' War (1712-1786) synonyms: Frederick II. see more.

  11. Frederick I - Definition, Meaning & Synonyms | Vocabulary.com

    www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/Frederick I

    Definitions of Frederick I. noun. Holy Roman Emperor from 1152 to 1190; conceded supremacy to the pope; drowned leading the Third Crusade (1123-1190) synonyms: Barbarossa, Frederick Barbarossa. see more.

  12. Charlottenburg | Royal Palace, Kurfürstendamm, Spree River

    www.britannica.com/place/Charlottenburg

    Originally called Lietzenburg, it was renamed for Sophie Charlotte, wife of Frederick I, king of Prussia, and was chartered in 1705. It was incorporated into Berlin in 1920. The palace, built in 1695–99 for the Queen, contains collections of antiquities, paintings, and musical instruments.