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  2. Merit (Buddhism) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merit_(Buddhism)

    Merit is not only a concept, but also a way of living. The Pāli canon identifies three bases of merit (puññakiriyā-vatthu), in order of difficulty: giving (dāna-maya) virtue (sīla-maya) mental development (bhāvanā-maya) In Buddhist texts and practice, giving is considered the easiest of the three bases of merit.

  3. Consequentialism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consequentialism

    In ethical philosophy, consequentialism is a class of normative, teleological ethical theories that holds that the consequences of one's conduct are the ultimate basis for judgment about the rightness or wrongness of that conduct.

  4. Free Books – AynRand.org

    aynrand.org/students/free-books

    Rand then develops her own theory, explaining what is identical across all the instances integrated by a properly formed concept. Her view is that concept formation, in crucial respects, is a mathematical process: it relies on a form of measurement. Essential to her theory is a new account of similarity and of abstraction as measurement-omission.

  5. Profit motive - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Profit_motive

    In economics, the profit motive is the motivation of firms that operate so as to maximize their profits.Mainstream microeconomic theory posits that the ultimate goal of a business is "to make money" - not in the sense of increasing the firm's stock of means of payment (which is usually kept to a necessary minimum because means of payment incur costs, i.e. interest or foregone yields), but in ...

  6. The Fountainhead - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fountainhead

    1943: Pages: 753 (1st edition) OCLC: 300033023: The Fountainhead is a 1943 novel by Russian-American author Ayn Rand, her first major literary success.The novel's protagonist, Howard Roark, is an intransigent young architect, who battles against conventional standards and refuses to compromise with an architectural establishment unwilling to accept innovation.

  7. Anahata - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anahata

    Etymology. In Sanskrit Anahata means "sound produced without touching two parts" and at the same time it means "pure" or "clean, stainless". The name of this chakra signifies the state of freshness that appears when we are able to become detached and to look at the different and apparently contradictory experiences of life with a state of openness (expansion).