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  2. William I, German Emperor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I,_German_Emperor

    William I or Wilhelm I (German: Wilhelm Friedrich Ludwig; 22 March 1797 – 9 March 1888) was King of Prussia from 2 January 1861 and German Emperor from 18 January 1871 until his death in 1888. A member of the House of Hohenzollern , he was the first head of state of a united Germany.

  3. Frederick III, German Emperor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_III,_German_Emperor

    In 1871, following Prussia's victories, the German states were united into the German Empire, with William as the Emperor and Frederick as heir-apparent to the new German monarchy. Although William thought the day when he became Emperor the saddest of his life, Frederick was excited to be witness to a great day in German history.

  4. Frederick William IV of Prussia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_William_IV_of...

    Frederick William, therefore, did attempt to establish the Erfurt Union, a union of the German states except for Austria, but abandoned the idea by the Punctation of Olmütz on 29 November 1850, in the face of renewed Austrian and Russian resistance. The German Confederation remained the common government of German Europe. Later years and death

  5. Wilhelm II, German Emperor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_II,_German_Emperor

    The German Emperor as shown in his public utterances; Hohenzollern, William II (1922), My Memoirs: 1878–1918, London: Cassell & Co, Google Books. The German emperor's speeches: being a selection from the speeches, edicts, letters, and telegrams of the Emperor William II; Works by Wilhelm II, German Emperor at Project Gutenberg

  6. Holy Roman Empire - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roman_Empire

    Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor, inheriting both German aspirations for imperial sovereignty and the Norman Sicilian kings' dream of hegemony in the Mediterranean, had ambitious design for a world empire. Boettcher remarks that marriage policy also played an important role here, "The marital policy of the Staufer ranged from Iberia to Russia, from ...

  7. Article expired - The Japan Times

    www.japantimes.co.jp/article-expired

    News on Japan, Business News, Opinion, Sports, Entertainment and More

  8. Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximilian_I,_Holy_Roman...

    William Cecil MacDonald comments that, in the context of German medieval literary patronage, "Maximilian's literary activities not only 'summarize' the literary patronage of the Middle Ages, but also represent a point of departure — a beacon for a new age." Moreover, "Like Charlemagne, Otto the Great, Henry II, and Frederick Barbarossa ...

  9. House of Hohenzollern - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Hohenzollern

    The House of Hohenzollern (/ h oʊ ə n ˈ z ɒ l ər n /, also US: /-ə n t s ɔː-, ˌ h oʊ ə n ˈ z ɒ l ər n,-ˈ z ɔː-/, German: Haus Hohenzollern, pronounced [ˌhaʊ̯s hoːənˈt͡sɔlɐn] (), Romanian: Casa de Hohenzollern) is a German royal (and from 1871 to 1918, imperial) dynasty whose members were variously princes, electors, kings and emperors of Hohenzollern, Brandenburg ...

  10. Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_IV,_Holy_Roman_Emperor

    On 11 July 1346, the prince-electors chose him as King of the Romans (rex Romanorum) in opposition to Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor. Charles was crowned on 26 November 1346 in Bonn. After his opponent died, he was re-elected in 1349 and crowned King of the Romans. In 1355, he was crowned King of Italy and Holy Roman Emperor.

  11. Wicked Flesh—Now in Paperback! Jessica Marie Johnson’s award-winning and groundbreaking book Wicked Flesh is now available in paperback from Penn Press! Unearthing personal stories from the archive, Wicked Flesh shows how black women used intimacy and kinship to redefine freedom in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world.