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  1. Donald Ervin Knuth ( / kəˈnuːθ / [3] kə-NOOTH; born January 10, 1938) is an American computer scientist, mathematician, and professor emeritus at Stanford University. He is the 1974 recipient of the ACM Turing Award, informally considered the Nobel Prize of computer science. [4] Knuth has been called the "father of the analysis of algorithms ".

    Donald Knuth - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Knuth
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  3. Donald Knuth - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Knuth

    Donald Ervin Knuth ( / kəˈnuːθ / [3] kə-NOOTH; born January 10, 1938) is an American computer scientist, mathematician, and professor emeritus at Stanford University. He is the 1974 recipient of the ACM Turing Award, informally considered the Nobel Prize of computer science. [4] Knuth has been called the "father of the analysis of algorithms ".

  4. Don Knuth's Home Page - Stanford University

    www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~knuth

    Donald E. Knuth (), Professor Emeritus of The Art of Computer Programming at Stanford University, welcomes you to his home page. Frequently Asked Questions Infrequently Asked Questions

  5. Donald Knuth's Profile | Stanford Profiles

    profiles.stanford.edu/donald-knuth

    Donald Ervin Knuth is an American computer scientist, mathematician, and Professor Emeritus at Stanford University. He is the author of the multi-volume work The Art of Computer Programming and has been called the "father" of the analysis of algorithms. He contributed to the development of the rigorous analysis of the computational complexity of algorithms and systematized formal mathematical techniques for it.

  6. Donald Knuth | Biography & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Donald-Knuth

    See all related content →. Donald Knuth, in full Donald Ervin Knuth, (born January 10, 1938, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.), American mathematician and computer scientist known for his authoritative multivolume series of books The Art of Computer Programming (1968– ) and the text-formatting language TeX. Knuth received a bachelor’s degree in mathematics in 1960 from the Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University) in Cleveland, Ohio, and his work was so impressive ...

  7. The Art of Computer Programming - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Art_of_Computer_Programming

    In January 1962, when he was a graduate student in the mathematics department at Caltech, Knuth was approached by Addison-Wesley to write a book about compiler design, and he proposed a larger scope. He came up with a list of twelve chapter titles the same day. In the summer of 1962 he worked on a FORTRAN compiler for UNIVAC.

  8. Donald Knuth | Stanford University School of Engineering

    engineering.stanford.edu/people/donald-knuth

    Donald Ervin Knuth is an American computer scientist, mathematician, and Professor Emeritus at Stanford University. He is the author of the multi-volume work The Art of Computer Programming and has been called the "father" of the analysis of algorithms. He contributed to the development of the rigorous analysis of the computational complexity of algorithms and systematized formal mathematical techniques for it.

  9. The Yoda of Silicon Valley - The New York Times

    www.nytimes.com/2018/12/17/science/donald-knuth-computers-algorithms...

    For half a century, the Stanford computer scientist Donald Knuth, who bears a slight resemblance to Yoda — albeit standing 6-foot-4 and wearing glasses — has reigned as the spirit-guide of the...

  10. Quanta Magazine

    www.quantamagazine.org/computer-scientist-donald-knuth-cant-stop-telling...

    Donald Knuth is a computer scientist who came of age with his field. During the nascent years of computer programming in the middle of the last century, a candy company ran a contest that summoned his talents as a 13-year-old. The contest asked kids to determine how many words could be made from the letters of the candy’s name: Ziegler’s Giant Bar.

  11. Donald Knuth’s 2022 ‘Christmas Tree’ Lecture Is about Trees

    thenewstack.io/donald-knuths-2022-christmas-tree-lecture-is-about-trees

    Knuth presented the smallest possible non-Baxter permutations — 3, 1, 4,2. He called it “the pi mutation,” since it’s a rounded approximation of pi to four digits. Over the years Knuth has found that when testing conjectures about permutations, “if the conjecture is false, it almost always fails at the pi mutation.”

  12. Donald Knuth - My advice to young people (93/97) Web of Stories - Life Stories of Remarkable People 46.7K subscribers 11K Share 675K views 10 years ago To listen to more of Donald Knuth’s...