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  2. Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_of_Langley,_1st...

    Edmund of Langley, Duke of York (5 June 1341 – 1 August 1402) was the fourth surviving son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. Like many medieval English princes, Edmund gained his nickname from his birthplace: Kings Langley Palace in Hertfordshire .

  3. Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_of_Woodstock,_1st...

    Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent (5 August 1301 – 19 March 1330), whose seat was Arundel Castle in Sussex, was the sixth son of King Edward I of England, and the second by his second wife Margaret of France, and was a younger half-brother of King Edward II.

  4. Edmund de la Pole, 3rd Duke of Suffolk - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_de_la_Pole,_3rd...

    Edmund de la Pole, 3rd Duke of Suffolk, 6th Earl of Suffolk, KG (c. 1471 – 30 April 1513), Duke of Suffolk, was a son of John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk and his wife Elizabeth of York. Although the male York line ended with the death of Edward Plantagenet and the Poles at first swore loyalty to the Tudor king of England, they later tried ...

  5. Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_of_York,_3rd_Duke...

    Richard of York was born on 22 September 1411, the son of Richard, Earl of Cambridge (1385–1415), and his wife Anne Mortimer (1388–1411). Both his parents were descended from King Edward III of England (1312–1377): his father was son of Edmund, 1st Duke of York (founder of the House of York), fourth surviving son of Edward III, whereas his mother Anne Mortimer was a great-granddaughter ...

  6. Margaret of Anjou - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_Anjou

    Edmund Beaufort, the Earl of Northumberland and Lord Clifford were killed, Wiltshire fled the battlefield and King Henry was taken prisoner by the victorious Duke of York. In March 1458 along with her husband and leading nobles of the warring factions, she took part in The Love Day procession in London .

  7. Side by side georeferenced maps viewer - Map images ...

    maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side

    Search an historic name from the GB1900 gazetteer of names on the OS six-inch 1888-1913 maps

  8. House of York - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_York

    The House of York was a cadet branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet.Three of its members became kings of England in the late 15th century. The House of York descended in the male line from Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, the fourth surviving son of Edward III.

  9. Edward of Middleham, Prince of Wales - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_of_Middleham...

    In 1478, Edward was granted the title of Earl of Salisbury, previously held by the attainted George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence. The title became extinct on his death. His father became King of England on 26 June 1483, deposing his nephew Edward V. Edward did not attend his parents' coronation, which was probably due to illness.

  10. Anne de Mortimer - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_de_Mortimer

    Around early 1408 (probably after 8 January), Anne married Richard of Conisburgh (1385–1415), the second son of Edmund, Duke of York (fourth son of King Edward III).The marriage was undertaken secretly and probably with haste, without the knowledge of her nearest relatives, and was validated on 23 May 1408 by papal dispensation.

  11. John of Gaunt - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Gaunt

    John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster (6 March 1340 – 3 February 1399) was an English royal prince, military leader, and statesman. He was the fourth son (third to survive infancy as William of Hatfield died shortly after birth) of King Edward III of England , and the father of King Henry IV .