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  1. Moltke was the grandnephew of Helmuth von Moltke the Younger and the great-grandnephew of Helmuth von Moltke the Elder, the victorious commander in the Austro-Prussian and Franco-Prussian Wars, from whom he inherited the Kreisau estate in Prussian Silesia, now Krzyżowa in Poland.

    Helmuth James von Moltke - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmuth_James_von_Moltke
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  3. Helmuth von Moltke the Younger - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmuth_von_Moltke_the_Younger

    Graf Helmuth Johannes Ludwig von Moltke (German: [ˈhɛlmuːt fɔn ˈmɔltkə]; 25 May 1848 – 18 June 1916), also known as Moltke the Younger, was a German general and Chief of the Great German General Staff.

  4. Helmuth James von Moltke - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmuth_James_von_Moltke

    Moltke was the grandnephew of Helmuth von Moltke the Younger and the great-grandnephew of Helmuth von Moltke the Elder, the victorious commander in the Austro-Prussian and Franco-Prussian Wars, from whom he inherited the Kreisau estate in Prussian Silesia, now Krzyżowa in Poland.

  5. Helmuth von Moltke the Elder - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmuth_von_Moltke_the_Elder

    Early life. Moltke was born in Parchim, Mecklenburg-Schwerin, son of the German Generalleutnant in Danish service, Friedrich Philipp Victor von Moltke (1768–1845). In 1805, his father settled in Holstein, but about the same time was left impoverished when the French burned his country house and plundered his townhouse in Lübeck, where his wife and children were during the War of the Fourth ...

  6. Alfred von Schlieffen - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_von_Schlieffen

    A favourite of the Emperor was Helmuth von Moltke the Younger, who became Chief of Staff after Schlieffen retired. Moltke went on to devise Aufmarsch II Ost, a variant upon Schlieffen's Aufmarsch Ost designed for an isolated Russo-German war.

  7. Helmuth von Moltke | German military commander [1848–1916]

    www.britannica.com/biography/Helmuth-Johannes...

    Helmuth von Moltke, (born May 25, 1848, Gersdorff, Mecklenburg [Germany]—died June 18, 1916, Berlin), chief of the German General Staff at the outbreak of World War I. His modification of the German attack plan in the west and his inability to retain control of his rapidly advancing armies significantly contributed to the halt of the German offensive on the Marne in September 1914 and the ...

  8. August von Mackensen - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_von_Mackensen

    His wife died in 1905 and, two years later, he married Leonie von der Osten, who was 22 years old. When Schlieffen retired in 1906, Mackensen was considered as a possible successor, but the position went to Helmuth von Moltke the Younger. In 1908, Mackensen was given command of the XVII Army Corps, headquartered in Danzig.

  9. Prussian Army - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prussian_Army

    With regard to a possible future two-front war, Alfred von Schlieffen, the Chief of the General Staff from 1891–1906, had suggested a deployment scheme which became known as the Schlieffen Plan. Modified by Moltke the Younger, its intention of quickly defeating France proved

  10. Theobald von Bethmann Hollweg - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_von_Bethmann_Hollweg

    Pourtales' telegram of 31 July was what Helmuth von Moltke the Younger, who declared a Zustand drohender Kriegsgefahr (state of imminent danger of war), wanted to hear; to Bethmann Hollweg's dismay, the other powers had failed to communicate Russia's provocation.

  11. World War I - Military technology and initial strategies

    www.britannica.com/event/World-War-I/Technology...

    Thus, the maximum of strength was allocated to the wheel’s edge—that is, to the right. Schlieffen’s plan was observed by the younger Helmuth von Moltke, who became chief of the general staff in 1906. Moltke was still in office when war broke out in 1914.

  12. Schlieffen Plan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schlieffen_Plan

    Generaloberst (Colonel-General) Helmuth von Moltke the Younger succeeded Schlieffen as Chief of the German General Staff in 1906 and was dismissed after the First Battle of the Marne (5–12 September 1914). German historians claimed that Moltke had ruined the plan by meddling with it, out of timidity.