AOL Web Search

  1. About 44 search results
  1. Moltke was the grandnephew of Helmuth von Moltke the Younger and the great-grandnephew of Helmuth von Moltke the Elder, the victorious commander in the Austro-Prussian and Franco-Prussian Wars, from whom he inherited the Kreisau estate in Prussian Silesia, now Krzyżowa in Poland.

    Helmuth James von Moltke - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmuth_James_von_Moltke
  2. Web results:
  3. Helmuth von Moltke the Younger - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmuth_von_Moltke_the_Younger

    Graf Helmuth Johannes Ludwig von Moltke (German: [ˈhɛlmuːt fɔn ˈmɔltkə]; 25 May 1848 – 18 June 1916), also known as Moltke the Younger, was a German general and Chief of the Great German General Staff.

  4. Helmuth von Moltke the Elder - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmuth_von_Moltke_the_Elder

    Early life. Moltke was born in Parchim, Mecklenburg-Schwerin, son of the German Generalleutnant in Danish service, Friedrich Philipp Victor von Moltke (1768–1845). In 1805, his father settled in Holstein, but about the same time was left impoverished when the French burned his country house and plundered his townhouse in Lübeck, where his wife and children were during the War of the Fourth ...

  5. Helmuth James von Moltke - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmuth_James_von_Moltke

    Moltke was the grandnephew of Helmuth von Moltke the Younger and the great-grandnephew of Helmuth von Moltke the Elder, the victorious commander in the Austro-Prussian and Franco-Prussian Wars, from whom he inherited the Kreisau estate in Prussian Silesia, now Krzyżowa in Poland.

  6. Helmuth von Moltke | German military commander [1848–1916]

    www.britannica.com/biography/Helmuth-Johannes...

    Helmuth von Moltke, (born May 25, 1848, Gersdorff, Mecklenburg [Germany]—died June 18, 1916, Berlin), chief of the German General Staff at the outbreak of World War I. His modification of the German attack plan in the west and his inability to retain control of his rapidly advancing armies significantly contributed to the halt of the German offensive on the Marne in September 1914 and the ...

  7. Alfred von Schlieffen - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_von_Schlieffen

    A favourite of the Emperor was Helmuth von Moltke the Younger, who became Chief of Staff after Schlieffen retired. Moltke went on to devise Aufmarsch II Ost, a variant upon Schlieffen's Aufmarsch Ost designed for an isolated Russo-German war.

  8. SMS Moltke - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMS_Moltke

    SMS Moltke Moltke visiting Hampton Roads, Virginia in 1912 History German Empire Name Moltke Namesake Helmuth von Moltke the Elder Ordered 17 September 1908 Builder Blohm & Voss Laid down 7 December 1908 Launched 7 April 1910 Commissioned 30 August 1911 Fate Scuttled 21 June 1919 at Scapa Flow, raised in 1927 and scrapped 1927–1929 General characteristics Class and type Moltke -class ...

  9. Prussian Army - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prussian_Army

    With regard to a possible future two-front war, Alfred von Schlieffen, the Chief of the General Staff from 1891–1906, had suggested a deployment scheme which became known as the Schlieffen Plan. Modified by Moltke the Younger, its intention of quickly defeating France proved

  10. No Plan Survives Contact with the Enemy - Boot Camp ...

    bootcampmilitaryfitnessinstitute.com/military...

    According to Beatrice Heuser (2002, p.89), Clausewitz “…wrote that no war plan outlasts the first encounter with the enemy, a view that was echoed by Moltke.” However, Terence Holmes (2007, p.129) argues “That is indeed a well-known opinion of Field Marshal Count Helmuth von Moltke’s, but it is not a quotation from Clausewitz.”

  11. Schlieffen Plan Facts and History - History for Kids

    historyforkids.org/schlieffen-plan

    Germany went to war with the plan of Helmuth von Moltke. He was younger and his plan was different than Schlieffen’s. Germany went to war with Russia on August 1st, 1914. On that day, it also declared war on France and sent its army through Belgium to attack Paris. The attack in 1914 was almost successful.

  12. Schlieffen Plan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schlieffen_Plan

    Generaloberst (Colonel-General) Helmuth von Moltke the Younger succeeded Schlieffen as Chief of the German General Staff in 1906 and was dismissed after the First Battle of the Marne (5–12 September 1914). German historians claimed that Moltke had ruined the plan by meddling with it, out of timidity.