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  2. Oliver! - Rotten Tomatoes

    www.rottentomatoes.com/m/oliver

    Oliver! G 1968, Musical, 2h 26m 89% Tomatometer 76 Reviews 81% Audience Score 50,000+ Ratings What to know critics consensus Oliver! transforms Charles Dickens' muckraking novel into a jaunty...

  3. The name Oliver is primarily a male name of English origin that means Descendant Of The Ancestor. Contrary to popular belief, the name Oliver has nothing to do with the olive tree. The name Oliver is derived from the old Norse name Áleifr, meaning "ancestor's descendant." The most common nickname for Oliver is Ollie.

  4. Oliver: Name Meaning, Origin, Popularity - Verywell Family

    www.verywellfamily.com/oliver-name-meaning-origin-popularity-5185831

    Oliver is a well-known name with a variety of meanings in different languages. The name Oliver is derived from the old Norse name Áleifr, meaning “ancestor’s descendent.”. Introduced by the Normans to England, the name also has roots in France. In French, o livier means "olive tree."

  5. Oliver! (1968) - IMDb

    www.imdb.com/title/tt0063385

    Drama Family Musical After being sold to a mortician, young orphan Oliver Twist runs away and meets a group of boys trained to be pickpockets by an elderly mentor in 1830s London. Director Carol Reed Writers Lionel Bart (book by) Vernon Harris (screenplay) Charles Dickens (freely adapted from "Oliver Twist" by) Stars Mark Lester Ron Moody

  6. Oliver (singer) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_(singer)

    Oliver (singer) William Oliver Swofford (February 22, 1945 – February 12, 2000), known professionally as Oliver, was an American pop singer, best known for his 1969 song "Good Morning Starshine" from the musical Hair as well as "Jean" (the theme from the film The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie ). Contents 1 Career 2 Personal life and death 3 Discography

  7. Oliver! (1968) - Turner Classic Movies

    www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/85532/oliver

    Oliver! (1968) -- (Movie Clip) I Want Some More The big moment, Mark Lester (title character) draws the long straw and asks the impermissible question, Harry Secombe and Peggy Mount as Mr. and Mrs. Bumble leading the Lionel Bart song, in director Carol Reed’s Best Picture-winning adaptation of the West End musical based on the Dickens novel, Oliver!, 1968.

  8. Oliver! (film) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver!_(film)

    Oliver! is a 1968 British period musical drama film based on Lionel Bart's 1960 stage musical of the same name, itself an adaptation of Charles Dickens's 1838 novel Oliver Twist. Directed by Carol Reed from a screenplay by Vernon Harris , the picture includes such musical numbers as " Food, Glorious Food ", " Consider Yourself ", " As Long as He Needs Me ", " You've Got to Pick a Pocket or Two ", and " Where Is Love?

  9. Oliver! (1968) - Trivia - IMDb

    www.imdb.com/title/tt0063385/trivia

    Only after Oliver has chance encounters with many more people in a "degrees of separation" chain, a treasure hunt eventually uncovers the truth. Charles Dickens ' stories are full of this kind of 'coincidental' subplot where characters from many different walks of life and hometowns all show up in London and discover that they are secretly connected to each other.

  10. Oliver! - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver!

    Oliver is introduced to Fagin and his boys, and is taught their ways ("You've Got to Pick a Pocket or Two"). The next day, Oliver meets Nancy, an older member of Fagin's gang, and the live-in wife of Fagin's terrifying associate Bill Sikes, a brutal house-burglar whose abuse she endures because she loves him. Nancy, along with her young friend Bet, a 15-year-old lass who idolizes Nancy, and the boys sing about how they don't mind a bit of danger ("It's a Fine Life").

  11. Jerk (Oliver Tree song) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerk_(Oliver_Tree_song)

    Tree. Lyric video. "Jerk" on YouTube. " Jerk " is a song by American singer Oliver Tree, originally released on July 17, 2020, as part of his debut studio album Ugly Is Beautiful. Upon release, the song largely stood out to music critics reviewing the album. Noted for its "groan haunts", Pitchfork writer Cat Zhang drew comparisons to Billie Joe ...