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  1. Potter Palmer (May 20, 1826 – May 4, 1902) was an American businessman who was responsible for much of the development of State Street in Chicago. Born in Albany County, New York, [1] he was the fourth son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Potter) Palmer. [2] Contents 1 Retailing career 2 Real estate career 3 Personal life 4 References 5 Further reading

    Potter Palmer - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potter_Palmer
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  3. Potter Palmer - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potter_Palmer

    Potter Palmer (May 20, 1826 – May 4, 1902) was an American businessman who was responsible for much of the development of State Street in Chicago. Born in Albany County, New York, [1] he was the fourth son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Potter) Palmer. [2] Contents 1 Retailing career 2 Real estate career 3 Personal life 4 References 5 Further reading

    • What Happened to the Potter Palmer Mansion in Chicago?
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    • The Inheritors: Potter Palmer of Chicago
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    • Potter Palmer Dies in 1902
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    • Potter Palmer II Dies in 1943
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  4. Potter Palmer | American businessman | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Potter-Palmer

    Potter Palmer, (born May 20, 1826, Albany county, New York, U.S.—died May 4, 1902, Chicago, Illinois), American merchant and real-estate promoter who was responsible for the development of much of the downtown district and the Lake Shore Drive area of Chicago after the city’s great fire of 1871. Palmer started as a clerk in a general store in Durham, New York.

  5. Mrs. Potter Palmer - chicagology

    chicagology.com/biographies/mrspotterpalmer

    Mrs. Potter Palmer, who came over from Liverpool on the Cunard steamship Lusitania, September 13, made the trip from Liverpool to Chicago in 6 days, 11 hours, 45 minutes, apparent time—or 6 days, 16 hours, 45 minutes, actual time. Mrs. Potter left Liverpool September 7, 9:10 p.m.; arrived New York, September 13, at noon; left by Pennsylvania special at 3:55 p.m.

  6. The Potter Palmers and their famous castle — Glessner House

    www.glessnerhouse.org/story-of-a-house/2013/03/...

    The Potter Palmers and their famous castle. Glessner House Museum. The Potter Palmer “castle” which stood at 1350 N. Lake Shore Drive for more than half a century remains one of the most legendary houses ever built in Chicago, despite the fact it was razed in 1950. Likewise, the builders, Potter and Bertha Honoré Palmer, are names that remain well-known to anyone with even a passing interest in Chicago history.

  7. Potter Palmer - chicagology

    chicagology.com/biographies/palmer

    Potter Palmer. Biographical Sketches of the Leading Men in Chicago, Photographically Illustrated by John Carbutt, 1868, Pages 611-613. Potter Palmer, the first merchant prince of Chicago, is a native of Albany County, New York. His grandparents moved thither at an early day from New Bedford, Massachusetts. They were Quakers, as were most of the old families of that once important seaport town.

  8. Potter Palmer. Birth. 20 May 1826. Potter Hollow, Albany County, New York, USA. Death. 4 May 1902 (aged 75) Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA. Burial. Graceland Cemetery.

  9. Potter Palmer (May 20, 1826 – May 4, 1902) was an American businessman who was responsible for much of the development of State Street in Chicago. Born in Albany County, New York, he was the fourth son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Potter) Palmer. Business Magnate, Real Estate Developer.

  10. The Palmers | American Experience | Official Site | PBS

    www.pbs.org/.../features/chicago-palmers

    In short, Potter Palmer created "shopping" as we know it. In 1865, as a thirty-nine-year-old bachelor in poor health, he abruptly gave control of his business to the young Marshall Field and his...

  11. Palmer Mansion - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palmer_Mansion

    The Palmer Mansion was a large private home constructed 1882–1885 at 1350 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois. Once the largest private residence in the city, it was located in the Near North Side neighborhood, facing Lake Michigan. It was designed by architects Henry Ives Cobb and Charles Sumner Frost of the firm Cobb and Frost and built for Bertha and Potter Palmer, a prominent local businessman responsible for much of the development of State Street. The construction of the mansion ...