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  1. Robert Georges Nivelle (15 October 1856 – 22 March 1924) was a French artillery general officer who served in the Boxer Rebellion and the First World War. In May 1916, he succeeded Philippe Pétain as commander of the French Second Army in the Battle of Verdun , leading counter-offensives that rolled back the German forces in late 1916.

    Robert Nivelle - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nivelle
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  3. Robert Nivelle - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nivelle

    Robert Georges Nivelle (15 October 1856 – 22 March 1924) was a French artillery general officer who served in the Boxer Rebellion and the First World War. In May 1916, he succeeded Philippe Pétain as commander of the French Second Army in the Battle of Verdun , leading counter-offensives that rolled back the German forces in late 1916.

  4. Robert Nivelle | French military officer | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Robert-Nivelle

    Robert Nivelle, in full Robert Georges Nivelle, (born October 15, 1856, Tulle, France—died March 23, 1924, Paris), commander in chief of the French armies on the Western Front for five months in World War I. His career was wrecked by the failure of his offensive in the spring of 1917.

  5. Robert Nivelle — Wikipédia

    fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nivelle

    Robert Nivelle naît à Tulle mais n'y vit pas, et n'y revient qu'en 1920 2 . Artilleur de formation et diplômé de l' École polytechnique (X 1876), le 1er septembre 1880, Robert Nivelle est affecté au 19e régiment d'Artillerie a Nîmes, au grade de Lieutenant.

  6. Robert Nivelle - History Learning Site

    www.historylearningsite.co.uk/.../robert-nivelle

    Robert Nivelle, the man who planned the spring 1917 Nivelle Offensive, was a hero of the Battle of Verdun and a man who had acquired friends at the highest levels of French politics. The failure of the Nivelle Offensive ended in his sacking as Commander-in-Chief of the French Army and his posting to North Africa where he spent the rest of World War One.

  7. The Nivelle Offensive - History Learning

    historylearning.com/world-war-one/world-war-one-battles/nivelle-offensive

    Robert Nivelle Nivelle’s plan involved a major assault by French forces on the Aisle region, which would be supported by a secondary attack by British troops at Arras, Vimy Ridge and on the Hindenburg Line at Bullecourt. The attack began on 9th April 1917 and lasted until 16th May.

  8. Robert Nivelle - Wikiquote

    en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Robert_Nivelle

    Robert Georges Nivelle (15 October 1856 – 22 March 1924) was a French artillery general officer who served in the Boxer Rebellion, and the First World War. Nivelle was a very capable commander and organizer of field artillery at the regimental and divisional levels. In May 1916, he succeeded Philippe Pétain as commander of the French Second Army in the Battle of Verdun, leading counter-offensives that rolled back the German forces in late 1916.

  9. Robert Nivelle (15 october 1856 - 22 March 1924) was a French general during World war 1. He mostly became known for his suceses at the First Battle of the Marne. . For these suceses, hew was made general. Later, he replacced Philpipe Pétain near Verdun . 1924 deaths French generals This page was last changed on 5 April 2021, at 13:59.

  10. They Shall Not Pass | 1916 | National WWI Museum and Memorial

    www.theworldwar.org/exhibitions/they-shall-not-pass-1916

    On June 23, French General Robert Nivelle exhorted his men to hold: vous ne les laisserrez pas passer (you shall not let them pass).The shortened adopted French battle cry then and forever after the 1916 battle was on ne passe pas or ils ne passeront pas (they shall not pass).

  11. Nivelle offensive - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nivelle_offensive

    Nivelle ordered the Tenth Army forward between the Fifth and Sixth armies on 21 April and local operations were continued on the fronts of the Fourth and Fifth armies with little success. On 4 to 5 May Brimont was to be captured, which would have been of great tactical value to the French; the attack was postponed on the orders of the French government and was then cancelled.

  12. They shall not pass - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/They_shall_not_pass

    The widespread use of the slogan originates from the 1916 Battle of Verdun in the First World War when French General Robert Nivelle urged his troops not to let the enemy pass. The simplified slogan of "they shall not pass" appeared on French war propaganda posters, most notably by French artist Maurice Neumont [ fr ] in the last year of the war after the Allied victory at the Second Battle of the Marne .